Army bans KIND bars containing 0.001 percent THC

A long day of defending America against her enemies works up a mighty appetite, but members of the U.S. Army looking to the popular KIND brand energy bars for a snack better watch out, because certain bars have been banned by the military due to the fact that they contain hemp seeds and very low levels of THC which might cause soldiers to fail a drug test.

The bars to look out for, according to the official homepage of the United States Army, are Hickory Smoked, Roasted Jalapeno, Honey Mustard, Thai Sweet Chili, and Honey Smoked BBQ, all flavors in the Strong & KIND line of bars marketed specifically as high protein snacks.

USA Today reports that KIND spokeswoman Stephanie Peterson has reached out the military, explaining that the recipes used in the creation of their products adhere to USDA standards and that banned bars only contain THC levels around 0.001 percent. She also explains, “We include hemp seeds in our Strong & KIND bars because they contribute protein, fiber and other important nutrients such as potassium and phosphorus. Hemp, when combined with the protein from almonds, peas and pumpkin seeds, provides all nine essential amino acids.”

The article on the Army’s homepage quotes Capt. Chrisopher DiPiro as saying the only harm in eating hemp seeds is risking failing a drug test, and that that most people would not actually test positive after consuming the amounts of hemp found in these snacks, but the snacks remain forbidden to soldiers.

Any teenagers reading this, fantasizing about gaming the legal system by legally purchasing Strong & KIND bars as a way around prohibitive drug laws, should be advised that, according an article on the Army’s website, “the amounts of THC in hemp seeds is negligible unless someone eats over 300 grams, which would be about two-thirds pound of hemp seeds.” Also be advised that a box of Strong & KIND bars containing 24 individually wrapped bars runs $36 on the company’s website, so this is definitely not a cost effective measure.

The real take away here: the next time you see an Army recruitment ad where a soldier fights a lava monster or utilizes cutting edge technology to fight sinister villains and become the best they can be, remember that everyone whose job it is now to worry about the THC levels in snacks, make decisions about whether these snacks should be available, and ultimately spend the day defending that decision, once saw the same advertisement, and that it moved something inside of them.

The post Army bans KIND bars containing 0.001 percent THC appeared first on MJI News.

Army bans KIND bars containing 0.001 percent THC

A long day of defending America against her enemies works up a mighty appetite, but members of the U.S. Army looking to the popular KIND brand energy bars for a snack better watch out, because certain bars have been banned by the military due to the fact that they contain hemp seeds and very low levels of THC which might cause soldiers to fail a drug test.

The bars to look out for, according to the official homepage of the United States Army, are Hickory Smoked, Roasted Jalapeno, Honey Mustard, Thai Sweet Chili, and Honey Smoked BBQ, all flavors in the Strong & KIND line of bars marketed specifically as high protein snacks.

USA Today reports that KIND spokeswoman Stephanie Peterson has reached out the military, explaining that the recipes used in the creation of their products adhere to USDA standards and that banned bars only contain THC levels around 0.001 percent. She also explains, “We include hemp seeds in our Strong & KIND bars because they contribute protein, fiber and other important nutrients such as potassium and phosphorus. Hemp, when combined with the protein from almonds, peas and pumpkin seeds, provides all nine essential amino acids.”

The article on the Army’s homepage quotes Capt. Chrisopher DiPiro as saying the only harm in eating hemp seeds is risking failing a drug test, and that that most people would not actually test positive after consuming the amounts of hemp found in these snacks, but the snacks remain forbidden to soldiers.

Any teenagers reading this, fantasizing about gaming the legal system by legally purchasing Strong & KIND bars as a way around prohibitive drug laws, should be advised that, according an article on the Army’s website, “the amounts of THC in hemp seeds is negligible unless someone eats over 300 grams, which would be about two-thirds pound of hemp seeds.” Also be advised that a box of Strong & KIND bars containing 24 individually wrapped bars runs $36 on the company’s website, so this is definitely not a cost effective measure.

The real take away here: the next time you see an Army recruitment ad where a soldier fights a lava monster or utilizes cutting edge technology to fight sinister villains and become the best they can be, remember that everyone whose job it is now to worry about the THC levels in snacks, make decisions about whether these snacks should be available, and ultimately spend the day defending that decision, once saw the same advertisement, and that it moved something inside of them.

The post Army bans KIND bars containing 0.001 percent THC appeared first on MJI News.